Barbara on October 27th, 2009

The high tech analyst business seemed to be on the brink of imploding due to the tech recession in 2002, and in 2004 at least one Boston journalist was calling for Wall Street style disclosure. These are are among the links you’ll find on this page. This is what I call the AR historical archives, part 2.

For the last few years, I’ve housed this list at the IIAR’s free Yahoo! community for analyst relations professionals. The IIAR plans to shut down that group in December. So I’m posting my archives here. The links are ordered by date.

This section puts the analyst business under scrutiny. It contains links to historical journalist coverage and 1 academic piece investigating the ICT industry analyst business. The links are ordered by date.

The first section is a collection of links where analysts opine on AR. It’s located here.

(MOSTLY) JOURNALISTS ON ANALYSTS

CRMBuyer 3-2007: “Technology Buyers: So Many Needs, So Little Time”
Free. Louis Columbus on tech buyers as process owners and how that impacts analyst influence.

InformationWeek 12-2006: “Ban The Analysts! Or Not?”
Follow up on The Reg and NY Times. Includes reader comments.

The Register 12-2006: “NY Times rattles IT industry with analyst ban”
Ashlee Vance smacksdown the NY Times for slipshod and unfair editorial treatment of Rob Enderle.

The Register 12-2006: “Forrester can’t stand up for falling down over iTunes”
The Reg tries to get the last word in the media and Forrester blame game over inaccurate editorial resulting in a signficant drop in Apple stock prices the week of 11 December 2006. Also see Forrester blog posts this week.

TheAustralianIT 11-2006: “Giant Gartner strands alone”
Interview with Peter Sondergaard

InformationWeek 5-2006: “Blog-Based Analysts Shake Up IT Research”
Free. A new breed of IT analysts is sharing insights over the Internet, leaving traditional research firms trying to catch up using the same methods.

InformationWeek 2-2006: “Credibility of Analysts”
Free. Do tech vendors wield influence over IT research? You bet–but how much of it is a matter of perspective?

InformationWeek 2-2006: “How Cisco Networks with Analysts”
Free. Short sidebar to “Credibility of Analysts”

The Register 4-2006: “Pundit responds to ‘troubling’ Reg attack”
Enderle responds to Vance’s negative comments about his integrity.

The Register 4-2006: “Sun zinged by rent-a-quote analyst”
Ashlee Vance smacksdown The Economist for citing Rob Enderle on Sun.

Boston Globe 11-2004: “Adapting to shift in tech landscape”
Free. Research gurus scrambling to expand offerings and merge

Boston.com 10-2004. “Full disclosure overdue from tech analysts”
$. Is a Wall Street-style clean up overdue in the world of technology analysts?

CIO 3-2004: “Bad News for Analysts, Good News for CIOs”
Free. Today, when it comes to research and analysis, CIOs are taking advantage of what looks to be a permanent buyer’s market. It’s not that research is suddenly worthless. It’s just suddenly worth less.

Network World 3-2003: “Making Informed Decisions”
Free. Rising commodity information, drop in IT spending impact how analysts deliver research to best meet customer needs.

Baseline 12-2002 “Why Tech Analysts Feel Your Pain”
Free. The only thing worse than working for a technology company over the past year, so the joke goes, is being an adviser to users of technology.

Anderson School at UCLA 5-2002: “IT Research and Analysis Services: Surveying their Usefulness” (link opens a pdf)
Free. Academic report on how subscribers make use of IT R&A services, in what context the services are most useful, and why some firms do not subscribe. By David R. Firth and E. Burton Swanson.

InformationWeek 10-2001: “Analyzing the Analysts”
Free. InformationWeek Research’s Analyzing the Analysts series began in 1997 as a biennial study focused on customer evaluations of IT market-research analyst firms. See the half dozen related links in sidebars and TOC for the complete report.

InformationWeek 11-1999: “Analyzing the Analysts”
Free. InformationWeek Research’s Analyzing the Analysts series began in 1997 as a biennial study focused on customer evaluations of IT market-research analyst firms. See the half dozen related links in sidebars and TOC for the complete report.

Popularity: 2%

Barbara on October 27th, 2009

Ten years ago 91 analysts and journalists went on record with their top gripes about vendor briefings and vendor PR representatives - in other words, “AR”. Jeffrey Tarter, then the mastermind behind Softletter, did the research and compiled the results. That report is still useful perspective for analyst relations professionals today. It’s one of the links I’m posting here, part of  what I call the AR historical archive.

For the last few years, I’ve housed this list at the IIAR’s free Yahoo! community for analyst relations professionals. The IIAR plans to shut down that group in December. So I’m posting my archives here. The links are ordered by date.

The link to Jeffrey’s landmark report is at the end of this first section, Analysts on AR.

The second section (next post) puts the analyst business under scrutiny. It contains links to historical journalist and academic content investigating the analyst business.

ANALYSTS ON ANALYST RELATIONS (2007 - 1999)

ES Research Group 02-2007: “Working with Analysts” Free. Dave Stein blogs on analyst/vendor relations from both sides of the aisle

JupiterResearch 12-2006: “Lessons in Analyst Relations” No longer online. Free. Michael Gartnerberg blog post. Softly supports dedicated inhouse AR over other models. Original link:
http://weblogs.jupiterresearch.com/analysts/gartenberg/archives/2006/12/lessons_in_anal.html

AMI-Partners 11-2006: “7 Ingredients for a Winning Analyst Relations Program” Free. Reprint of Laurie McCabe’s out-of-print Kensington Group article, at the ARmadgeddon blog

RedMonk 11-2006: “Interview with James Governor, RedMonk” Free. Interview transcript on Helzerman’s Odd Bits Blog; scroll down to “Analyst Relations 101″ portion in particular.

Security Incite 11-2006: “Analyst Relations - Vendor Pet Peeves” and “Top 5 ways to piss Mike off” Free. Mike Rothman blogs on ”a couple of other things that annoy me about dealing with vendors”. And, the top 5 things vendors do that they shouldn’t.

Forrester Research 11-2006: “Analyst Models Are Key To Briefing Impact” $. Research Brief. Accommodate market models used by analysts, to improve likelihood of a successful briefing. By Kevin Lucas.

Forrester Research 10-2006: “The Three Archetypes Of Industry Analysts” $. Research Brief. How To Identify And Work With Advocates, Strategists, Evangelists. By Ray Wang.

Forrester Research 8-2006: “Five Steps For AR To Improve Credibility With Product Teams” $. Research Brief. This report focuses on five best practices for earning credibility with product teams. By Ray Wang.

Forrester Research 7-2006: “How to get a briefing at Forrester” Free. Charlene Li’s candid blog post with personal and general perspectives.

Burton Group 3-2006: “Gartner: Speedtalk for 30 Minutes” Free. Guy Creese’s blog jabs Gartner, then explains 3 common mistakes dogging vendors attempting to brief analysts.

Gartner 9-2005: “This is Ground Control to PR Tom” Free. Andy Bitterer blogs on understanding analyst coverage to target the right analysts.

Enderle Group 11-2004: “Building a Vendor Advisory Council” Free. Rob Enderle’s whitepaper defining the goals, methods, and measurements for building a successful analyst advisory council for a supplyside company.

Saugatuck 7-2004: “Reviewing Vendor Analyst Relations Management” No longer online. Free. 3 common, expensive mistakes: not deeming AR strategic; spending too much money on research; using PR firms for AR. By B. Guptill. Original link: http://www.saugatech.com/151view.htm

Giga Information Group 4-2003: “Analyst Relations: In-House or Outsourced to a PR Firm?” $. Idea Byte. AR should be internally staffed, or at least centrally managed, by experienced personnel rather than outsourced to PR, and the factors driving this become more pronounced as the company grows in size and complexity. By Rob Enderle.

Softletter 10-1999: “The Decline and Fall of Public Relations” Free. 91 reporters, editors, and analysts share specific rants about vendor PR. Compiled by Jeffrey Tarter.

Popularity: 3%

Barbara on October 19th, 2009

Britton Manasco sparked an interesting discussion over the weekend on PR, influencers and the caliber of a client’s vision messaging. Britton’s take:

PR firms, too often, are letting their executive clients down. They are encouraging them to stroll out in the public square unclothed and unprepared. Result? Their clients are exposed as leaders without vision… It seems to me that too few have the strengths, expertise and capabilities necessary to help their clients develop and articulate a powerful vision.

I agree with Britton that CEOs and other corporate leaders need to differentiate themselves and their companies with a compelling vision of their market. There are too few CEOs who inspire us with a vision of where we are and where we could go.

We disagree somewhat on how much of a role a traditional PR team can be expected to play in the development of vision. I say less, Britton says more.

In my experience, vision is not a PR project. Vision isn’t the result of a messaging brainstorm. It comes from everyday dialogue and reading and observation. The group of people best equipped to inspire and nuture a CxO’s vision come from inside the company and from the CxO’s peers also deeply engaged in the marketplace — external thought leaders from the ranks of management consultants, competitors, partners, academics, etc.

Check out Britton’s post and comments from Chris Selland, Ardath Albee and Steve Parker and me.

Popularity: 2%

Barbara on October 9th, 2009

Interested in working at an influencer marketing company? Good news - Influencer50 Inc. is hiring. The company is recruiting for a marketing manager to be based in the San Francisco office. They’re looking for an experienced marketing professional to manage one-to-one marketing outreach, influencer engagement programs for clients, and Influencer50’s online content. It’s a mid-senior level position suited for candidates with 6+ years’ experience in B2B marketing roles.

The position is listed exclusively on LinkedIn. Check it out and apply via LinkedIn.

If you work vendor-side, consider joining the “Influencer Marketing & Influencer Relations” group while you’re visiting LinkedIn.

Popularity: 3%