Many analyst relations departments survey their internal users and their analysts in the spirit of measuring satisfaction with AR programs, tools and processes. All too often, the results are too positive or too negative. In other words, the results are stilted to serve near-term budgeting, review or political agendas. This week’s CRMBuyer.com column by Louis Columbus, “Measuring Customer Satisfaction Like You Mean It”, provides a helpful reminder of top do’s and don’ts when designing a customer satisfaction measurement project, from constructing the sample to using results beyond a stand-up presentation.

Mr. Columbus is an expert on CRM and the author of “Getting Results from Your Analyst Relations Stratgies”, available on Amazon.

Reprinted from Tekrati

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A post in the HP-branded blog by David Gee, “True and Fair View…”, calls for the industry analyst community “to commit to the same standards of transparency, neutrality, governance and liability” as he believes can be found in the post-Sarbox world of financial investment advisors. The post is certainly not an HP OpenView management endorsement of IT analyst research quality or value. In fact, it reads as though Mr. Gee was inspired to write it based on the involvement of some analysts at a recent HP technical event.

Reprinted from Tekrati

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In conjunction with their new book, “Getting It Right the First Time: How Innovative Companies Anticipate Demand”, Internet Research Group principals Peter Christy and John Katsaros offer a one-page analyst perspective on do’s and don’ts for high tech vendors intent on briefing industry analysts. I suggest that analyst relations managers read the book and consider giving their spokespeople each a copy of the book, along with a print-out of the Do’s & Don’ts page. Here’s why.

1. For spokespeople: The Do’s and Don’ts are a minimalist list, and this is a good thing. If all else fails, don’t fail on the points explained by Christy and Katsaros. If your spokespeople have the attention span of a gnat or the ego of a shark, then these are the prep points to cover, cover, cover. Meanwhile, the book may help them rediscover the importance of accurate, well-informed forecasting.

2. For analyst relations professionals: The book can revitalize analyst relations managers, providing a launch pad for redefining the way that analyst relations and industry research contribute to high tech companies. Analyst relations managers are in a unique position to contribute to their organization’s success. The first challenge is envisioning such a role. This book can help:

In ‘Getting It Right the First Time’, we show that the most successful businesses will be those that accurately predict market conditions–especially the market changes that will occur within the crucial 18-to-36-month innovation window. Or, to paraphrase the advice hockey superstar Wayne Gretzky received from his father: ‘Skate to where the puck is going to be, not to where it is.’ — Katsaros and Christy

The Web site for the book is at www.irg-intl.com/book/index.htm. The analyst briefing Do’s and Don’ts are in the What’s Inside section.

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